Historic Lincoln Hall Renovation

University of Illinois

Lincoln Hall is one of the main 11 buildings bordering the University of Illinois main quad. Constructed in 1911 and expanded in 1929, Lincoln Hall had been in disrepair for many years and underwent a massive restoration project to bring the historic hall up to date both cosmetically and environmentally.

 

Lincoln Hall is the largest and most-used classroom building on campus. It features over 20 classrooms, the Lincoln Hall Theater, and grand marble foyer. An extensive facility assessment and master plan of the 160,000- sf building was performed by the design team. This allowed the team to understand the condition of existing systems, make recommendations for improvements, determine associated costs, and develop phasing plans. It was determined the building would be gutted back to the wall studs.

 

The exterior renovation included a new slate roof, windows, brick and mortar detailing, and reconstruction of an old carriage porch into a formal entrance to the building. The interior renovation included restoring 5,000 feet of original white oak paneling, baseboard, and door casings, a barrel-vault ceiling in the marble foyer, and all marble floors. The renovation included a complete new office configuration build-out and all new infrastructures for heating, air conditioning, electrical, plumbing, life safety, and new wiring and equipment for “smart” technology classrooms.

 

Air conditioning was added to the previously unconditioned building, which is connected to the central campus chilled water loop.

 

Energy-efficient design and sustainability were top priorities, and the project achieved LEED Platinum.

 

The basement was the logical place for the new mechanical room but had to be dug out to provide the height and room needed to accommodate the new air handlers. The units were designed to break down into smaller components and fed through windows and reconstructed, in order to not disturb the historic facade.

 

Design incorporated two dedicated outdoor air supply units (DOAS) with heat recovery wheels to supply outside air and exhaust to the individual AHUS for each floor. This eliminated the need to install 20 intake and exhaust louvers throughout the building, which would have intruded on the historic façade. Four adjacent area wells, another tactic for preserving the building’s historic façade, were installed to route fresh and exhaust air to the DOAS units.

 

The DOAS units also allowed for the installation of multiple smaller AHUs, which in turn required smaller ductwork. This provided the extra space needed in the existing structure and minimal ceiling cavity for sprinklers, cable trays and other utilities.

 

The first-floor classrooms and auditorium were designed with a low velocity displacement ventilation system. Existing ventilation shafts were used for ductwork and displacement diffusers to help maintain the historic integrity of the classrooms; in the auditorium, a large AHU was installed in an existing plenum under the floor. Existing return air openings were changed to supply air devices.

 

Achieving LEED points for daylighting was accomplished on the first through third floors with existing window space. The 4th floor windows, however, were too small for this purpose. The design team found a solution by cutting skylights into the fourth floor roof in coordination with the duct space.

 

All exterior zones have perimeter radiation to improve thermal comfort in the winter.

 

Water-saving features included low-flow urinals, dual flush toilets, and low-flow sensor lavatory faucets. Renovation to the existing theater/auditorium included new seats with ADA accessibility and aisle lights. Additional renovations included the lighting, ventilation, stage area, stage screen and control room. The lighting controls, curtain and batten controls on stage also were updated.

 

The existing pneumatic controls were replaced with a new single BAS to control the entire building.

 

The project was completed on time and on schedule for the 2012 fall classes.

Location

Champaign, IL

 

Size

160,000 SF

 

Services Provided

Mechanical, Electrical, Construction Administration, Plumbing, Fire Protection, Telecom

Lincoln Hall is one of the main 11 buildings bordering the University of Illinois main quad. Constructed in 1911 and expanded in 1929, Lincoln Hall had been in disrepair for many years and underwent a massive restoration project to bring the historic hall up to date both cosmetically and environmentally.

 

Lincoln Hall is the largest and most-used classroom building on campus. It features over 20 classrooms, the Lincoln Hall Theater, and grand marble foyer. An extensive facility assessment and master plan of the 160,000- sf building was performed by the design team. This allowed the team to understand the condition of existing systems, make recommendations for improvements, determine associated costs, and develop phasing plans. It was determined the building would be gutted back to the wall studs.

 

The exterior renovation included a new slate roof, windows, brick and mortar detailing, and reconstruction of an old carriage porch into a formal entrance to the building. The interior renovation included restoring 5,000 feet of original white oak paneling, baseboard, and door casings, a barrel-vault ceiling in the marble foyer, and all marble floors. The renovation included a complete new office configuration build-out and all new infrastructures for heating, air conditioning, electrical, plumbing, life safety, and new wiring and equipment for “smart” technology classrooms.

 

Air conditioning was added to the previously unconditioned building, which is connected to the central campus chilled water loop.

 

Energy-efficient design and sustainability were top priorities, and the project achieved LEED Platinum.

 

The basement was the logical place for the new mechanical room but had to be dug out to provide the height and room needed to accommodate the new air handlers. The units were designed to break down into smaller components and fed through windows and reconstructed, in order to not disturb the historic facade.

 

Design incorporated two dedicated outdoor air supply units (DOAS) with heat recovery wheels to supply outside air and exhaust to the individual AHUS for each floor. This eliminated the need to install 20 intake and exhaust louvers throughout the building, which would have intruded on the historic façade. Four adjacent area wells, another tactic for preserving the building’s historic façade, were installed to route fresh and exhaust air to the DOAS units.

 

The DOAS units also allowed for the installation of multiple smaller AHUs, which in turn required smaller ductwork. This provided the extra space needed in the existing structure and minimal ceiling cavity for sprinklers, cable trays and other utilities.

 

The first-floor classrooms and auditorium were designed with a low velocity displacement ventilation system. Existing ventilation shafts were used for ductwork and displacement diffusers to help maintain the historic integrity of the classrooms; in the auditorium, a large AHU was installed in an existing plenum under the floor. Existing return air openings were changed to supply air devices.

 

Achieving LEED points for daylighting was accomplished on the first through third floors with existing window space. The 4th floor windows, however, were too small for this purpose. The design team found a solution by cutting skylights into the fourth floor roof in coordination with the duct space.

 

All exterior zones have perimeter radiation to improve thermal comfort in the winter.

 

Water-saving features included low-flow urinals, dual flush toilets, and low-flow sensor lavatory faucets. Renovation to the existing theater/auditorium included new seats with ADA accessibility and aisle lights. Additional renovations included the lighting, ventilation, stage area, stage screen and control room. The lighting controls, curtain and batten controls on stage also were updated.

 

The existing pneumatic controls were replaced with a new single BAS to control the entire building.

 

The project was completed on time and on schedule for the 2012 fall classes.