Improving provider satisfaction through the built environment

Last in a series based on the IMEG executive guide, “Enhancing the Quadruple Aim through Data-driven Decisions in the Built Environment.” 

Healthcare provider burnout is a real, complex issue, and the competition for attracting and retaining the best physicians, advanced practice providers, and medical assistants is getting fierce. Fortunately, the built environment can greatly contribute to provider satisfaction—the fourth goal of the Quadruple Aim. 

Meeting this goal can be supported by a variety of built environment strategies, including: 

  • Lean designed facilities. Providers do not want to spend their careers in complicated environments. Opting for a lean, simplified environmental design contributes to easy and more efficient use of space.  
  • Proximity-focused layout. Physical fatigue can play a significant role in the dissatisfaction of healthcare providers, who spend most of each day on their feet. Designing the built environment so that related workspaces are nearby, and the number of steps providers must take throughout their shift is reduced, is well worth the effort as it enables more efficient care and minimizes fatigue.  
  • Individualized temperature control. Allowing each provider to select the temperature for their workspace will help increase their satisfaction with their work environment.  
  • Utilization of daylight, which is as important for the physical and mental health of providers as it is for patients. 
  • Site design. The built environment is not just about the facility interior—the entire site contributes to the provider’s experience. This includes attention to employee parking, accessibility to necessary mechanical systems, and private space where providers can work and take breaks in peace and quiet. 

For more information on this topic, download a copy of the IMEG executive guide, “Enhancing the Quadruple Aim through Data-driven Decisions in the Built Environment.” 

Previously:  

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